November, 2015

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In this Newsletter:



Current Exhibition

Enigma: Code, Narrative, SymbolNovember 5–December 12

Curator’s Talk: Professor Asa Mittman (Art and Art History), Thursday, November 5, 5:30 p.m., Rowland-Taylor Recital Hall (PAC 134), An exhibition reception will follow at The Turner.

James Nickel, Whizdumb, etching

James Nickel, Whizdumb, etching


The exhibition was inspired by the German artist Albrecht Dürer’s three museum reproduction prints, Knight, Devil and Death, Melencholia, and St. Jerome in His Study, included in the collection. Executed in 1513-14, the prints have since been acclaimed as Dürer’s master engravings because of their complexity, transcendence in subject, and virtuosity of composition and printing technique.

Inspired by his example and the concept of enigma, with its sense of puzzle, paradox, and riddle, advanced students in studio practice and art history combed the Turner Collection for relevant counterparts that manifest modern ideas of enigma. Students spent a semester making selections, followed by research and writing to develop exhibition essays that are displayed alongside the prints. The collaborative and cross-disciplinary nature of this exhibition provided an opportunity for art students to refine their curatorial, critical analysis, and aesthetic judgment skills.

Albrecht Dürer, Knight, Devil and Death, engraving (museum reproduction)

Albrecht Dürer, Knight, Devil and Death, engraving (museum reproduction)

The students worked in collaboration with Curator Catherine Sullivan and CSU, Chico faculty Asa Mittman, Eileen MacDonald, and Laura Nice. As Professor Mittman explains, “looking at enigmatic images, like those in this show, can help us to confront this point of trouble in our quest to figure out what to do with works of art. These works suggest ideas and themes, but resist simple answers and finite expressions of meaning. Instead, they ask us to work as we look at them, to think about the subjects and themes and visual properties they contain, the references they make, the associations they stress, and the motivations that drove their creators, without encouraging us to make declarative statements about final and absolute meanings. They might be puzzles, but they do not really have answers. Instead, they are invitations to puzzle, to ponder and wonder and worry and play. In this, they do what I would argue a great deal of art does. Their enigmatic nature brings this process to the fore, but should serve to encourage us to take this lesson to any and all works we might study. Here’s to enigmas, to doubt and murk and the frustrations, anxieties, and joys they inspire.”

Albrecht Dürer, Melencholia, engraving (museum reproduction)

Albrecht Dürer, Melencholia, engraving (museum reproduction)

Included in the exhibition are prints by local artists Michael Halldorson and Jerril Dean Kopp; Pop artists Robert Rauschenberg and David Salle; as well as legendary print artist and educator David Driesbach. Also, taking up a large portion of the lobby is The Transformation of Brandy Baghead, a master mural print by Tom Huck, considered a twisted modern Dürer with his contemporary relevance, masterful carving, and complex composition.

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Recent Acquisitions!

Dreisbach in his studio

Dreisbach in his studio

The Turner is excited to add significant prints by David F. Driesbach to the collection. Driesbach’s work has been exhibited in more than 250 solo exhibitions and 500 group exhibitions, including the Museum of Modern Art, the Art Institute of Chicago, and the Boston Museum of Fine Arts. Donated by long-term friends of The Turner, John and Jan Driesbach, Curator Catherine Sullivan notes:

“This donation comes with connections! John Driesbach taught printmaking at CSU, Sacramento and has been the juror for our annual student juried print exhibition. His wife Jan Driesbach was a long-time curator at the Crocker Art Museum, Sacramento, and our 1999 National Print Competition Exhibition juror. When offered the opportunity to add significant prints that expand the depth and breadth of the Turner Print collection’s holdings of John’s father, the legendary printmaker known for his virtuosity in intaglio printing, we were excited to accept!” A print by Driesbach is currently exhibited in Enigma: Code, Narrative, Symbol.

David F. Driesbach, Where Business Gets Down to Work, etching

David F. Driesbach, Where Business Gets Down to Work, etching

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Field Trips and Afternoon Classes for Children

Kids at The Turner

Led by CSU, Chico Professor of Art Education and Turner Board Member Dr. Teresa Cotner, The Turner is thrilled to extend our educational outreach. In collaboration with Chico Performance’s Field Trip series, The Turner invites students and teachers attending a Laxson performance to extend their arts experience by visiting The Turner. Visits must be confirmed in advance and include a hands-on activity, as well as a guided tour of the current exhibition. Additionally, The Turner continues to host free afternoon art classes for children, led by Professor Cotner and art education interns. For more information, availability, and a schedule of classes, email info@theturner.org.

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Jennifer Lee Tancreto (19 February 1978–1 October 2015)

Jennifer Lee Tancreto

Jennifer, an accomplished artist, generous teacher, and valued member of the art faculty at California State University, Chico, passed away on October 1, 2015. Jennifer earned her Master of Fine Arts in Printmaking from CSU, Chico in May, and was the recipient of numerous awards, scholarships, and prizes, including: Outstanding MFA Student (2015); Dean’s Prize, 60th Annual Juried Student Competition (2015); Hopper MFA Award (2014); Honorable Merit, 19th Student Print Exhibition & Ink/Clay (2014); Jerrill and Pat Kopp Print Award (2013); Janet Turner Award, 18th Student Print Exhibition and 11th Ink/Clay (2013) and the Janet Turner Scholarship (2012). Jennifer had recently been confirmed as a Turner Board Member for her expertise in printmaking as well as her commitment to the mission of The Turner.A scholarship has been set up in her name in the College of Humanities and Fine Arts. For information about how you can donate, click here

Jennifer Tancreto, untitled, monoprint

Jennifer Tancreto, untitled, monoprint

Jennifer was prolific in her production of new work, participating in group, juried, and solo exhibitions, including From Here You Can See (MFA Thesis Exhibition, 2015); Trending: New Talent from Northern California (2015) at the JayJay Gallery, Sacramento; and Scale, a group show of selected members of the California Society of Printmakers at Michael Yochum Gallery, San Francisco (2015). Jennifer is survived by her partner of 12 years, Miriam Roeder, her parents Gail and Mark Tancreto, her brother Michael Tancreto, nephews Noah and Lucas Tancreto, grandparents Louis and Penny Tancreto, as well as a large extended family.

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The Turner is Moving Soon!

Your help is needed now more than ever to move the Turner into the new, permanent museum space. Your generous donation will help provide new curatorial equipment, professional museum storage and preservation tools, special gallery lighting, and more.

Please make your gift today. Remember—You Move Art Moves You! If you have questions or would like to discuss the many ways you can help support the Turner, please contact Daria Booth, advancement director, at dbooth3@csuchico.edu or 530-898-4054.

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